I love a good deal as much as the next person. In recent years there always seems like there’s something to buy, something everyone says is necessary, despite having last year’s model still intact and barely used. Every year, there’s a new edition of something: a new phone, speaker, smart home device, kitchen appliance, etc. But what happens with the old one? Where does the new one go? The sad reality is things either end up on a landfill for years or cluttering the home as new generations of things pile on.

Black Friday is an American holiday with no shield covering up its entire goal: shopping. Since the 1950s, the term describes the bizarre consumer hysteria that ensues the day after Thanksgiving, the first day marking the Christmas season. The dichotomy of a holiday (despite its gruesome roots) dedicated to celebrating gratefulness for what a person has only to be followed by a whiplash of “I want more,” seems to speak volumes of the insidious nature of our American consumerism.  It almost makes you think Americans chose more material things instead of being truly thankful for the people and moments in their life.

Over the years, Black Friday has been speculated to be a bit of a gimmick. Reports have shown that companies will increase their prices only to decrease it on Black Friday and retain profits. Many consumers have caught on and felt cheated by the lack of corporate transparency.

Why are Black Friday deals toxic?

But this year is a little different. The pandemic will change Thanksgiving this year, where loved ones will be stowed away in their own homes and only reachable by a camera and strong Wi-fi. Maybe this will make people genuinely realize Thanksgiving’s values and that these moments and people are to be cherished. And maybe this feeling will blanket over the next day when the anxiety of shopping and adrenaline of getting “a deal” feels too much.

Reports say 57 percent of people are anxious about shopping on Black Friday this year. The numbers are up from last year, probably because of the pandemic, but not by much. Many stores have already started rolling out their discounts, and people aren’t sure whether to engage or not. But there’s a way to participate sustainably. It doesn’t have to be all or nothing.

We partnered with Ironside to bring attention to their new program, Colorful Friday, that reinvents Black Friday while supporting local shops. From 11 am to 8 pm, you can shop, eat, and enjoy local music. With an additional reservation, there’s even the option to enjoy brunch with bottomless mimosas.

Don’t worry if you can’t attend; we got you with our winter capsule collection curated with the incredible SM Vintage shop and its founder, Jaxx. Bonus: the blog includes an exclusive 18% discount code to support your eco-conscious consumer ways.